Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview
Save to active project

for Dr. Meade, drew with the pen, in the manner of La Fage, and often set his name to his drawings, with the time he had employed on them, which sometimes, even for large pieces, did not exceed fifteen minutes. Showing one of his designs to Dorigny, and boasting of this expedition, Sir Nicholas told him he should have thought a man of his vivacity might have executed two much in the time.


BERNARD BARON,

( 1725,)

brought over, as has been said, by Dubosc, with whom he broke, and went to law, on the plates for the story of Ulysses, engraved from the designs of Rubens, in the collection of Dr. Meade; but they were reconciled and went to Paris together in 1729, where Baron engraved a plate from Watteau, and engaged to do another from Titian, in the king's collection, for Monsieur Crozat, for which he was to receive 60l. sterling. While at Paris, they both sat to Vanloo. Baron has executed a great number of works, a few portraits, and some considerable pictures after the best masters : as the family of Cornaro at Northumberland-house; Vandyck's family of the Earl of Pembroke at Wilton; Henry VIII. giving the charter to the Company of Surgeons ; the equestrian figure of Charles I. by Vandyck, at Kensington; its companion, the king, queen, and two children; and King William on horseback, with emblematic figures, at Hampton-court. His last considerable work was the family of Nassau, by Vandyck, at the Earl Cowper's. 1 Baron died in Panton-square, Piccadilly, Jan. 24th, 1762.


HENRY GRAVELOT, 2

(1699-1773,)

was not much known as an engraver, but was an excellent draughtsman, and drew designs for ornaments in great

____________________
1
To which, as of equal merit, may be added, Robert Dormer, Earl of Carnarvon; Anna Sophia, his countess ; R. Mead, M.D. ; Lord Chancellor Hardwicke ; Lord Chief Justice Reeve and Dr. Hoadley, Bishop of Winton, from Hogarth.—D.
2
[Hubert François D'Anville, known under his assumed name of Gravellot, was the brother of D'Anville the geographer. He was born at Paris in 1699. He

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?