Anecdotes of Painting in England: With Some Account of the Principal Artists - Vol. 3

By Horace Walpole | Go to book overview

taste, and was a faithful copyist of ancient buildings, tombs, and prospeets, for which he was constantly employed by the artists in London. He drew the monuments of kings for Vertue, and gave the designs, where invention was necessary, for Pine's plates of the tapestry in the House of Lords. He had been in Canada as Secretary to the Governor; but the climate disagreeing with him he returned to France, whence he was invited over by Dubosc. He was for some time employed in Gloucestershire, drawing churches and antiquities. Vertue compared his neat manner to Picart, and owns that in composition and design he even excelled his favourite Hollar. He sometimes attempted painting small histories and conversations. Of his graving are the prints to Sir Thomas Hanmer's edition of Shakspeare, and many of them he designed; but it is his large print of Kirkstall-abbey which shows how able an engraver he was.


JOHN PINE,

(1690—1756,)

need but be mentioned, to put the public in mind of the several beautiful and fine works for which they are indebted to him. The chief of them are, the ceremonies used at the revival of the Order of the Bath by King George I; 1 the prints from the tapestry in the House of Lords, representing the destruction of the Spanish Armada, a book rivalling

____________________
commenced painting at about thirty-nine years of age, but took afterwards to designing and etching. He visited London about 1732, and returned to Paris in 1745, where he died in 1773. De Fontenai, Dictionnaire des Artistes.—W.]
1
Pine was first known as an engraver by these prints in 1725 ; those from the tapestry in the House of Lords, in ten plates, established his reputation, and he was induced to engrave five others to accompany them—a plan of the House of Peers—another of the House of Commons. Copies from Illuminations in the library of the Herald's-college. Interior of the House of Lords, with the King on the throne—and of the House of Commons, with the Speaker, near whom Sir R. Walpole is represented as standing when premier, in his usual posture.

He engraved an exact fac-simile of Magna Charta, from the original in the British Museum; and his copper-plate Horace still holds its place among the most elegant books. In 1743, he was made Blue Mantle Pursuivant, in the College of Arms ; where he afterwards resided, and died n 1756.

Hogarth cultivated his acquaintance, and thinking that both his countenance and person were peculiarly adapted to the portrait of the friar, in his print of the "Gates of Calais," introduced them without Pine's consent, who was piqued by having thus, ever after, acquired the name of Friar.—D.

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