The Rise of Mental Health Nursing: A History of Psychiatric Care in Dutch Asylums, 1890-1920

By Geertje Boschma | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

During the time I was working on this book I benefited from the scholarly support and advice of a large number of people. I am grateful for the generous comments and thoughtful critique on various papers, presentations and earlier drafts of this research. The study grew from an exploratory inquiry into the history of mental health nursing in the Netherlands in 1993 into a dissertation on the nursing care of the mentally ill in Dutch asylums under the dedicated and inspiring guidance of Joan Lynaugh at the Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, School of Nursing, at the University of Pennsylvania in 1997. I am especially grateful to the University of Calgary for a Killam Resident Fellowship and Research Award in 2000, which provided me with additional research time to further develop this study into a book. Additional financial research support came from Sigma Theta Tau Chi Chapter, the Catherine van Tussenbroek Foundation, Sigma Theta Tau International, the American Nurses Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. I would like to thank my colleagues at the Faculty of Nursing of the University of Calgary for their support and interest in the completion of this study. I would also like to thank women's historians Sarah Carter and Elizabeth Jameson at the Department of History at the University of Calgary for their encouragement in the final stages of this work. Joyce Hildebrand and Nadine Kozak provided excellent editorial and research assistance.

I am indebted to the faculty and fellow students at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, both in the graduate program and the Center for the Study of the History of Nursing of the School of Nursing, and in the Department of the History and Sociology of Science. Working with this outstanding community of scholars has profoundly influenced my thinking and shaped the direction of my research. From the School of Nursing I am especially grateful to Joan Lynaugh, Ellen Baer, Karen Wilkerson, and Margaret Cotroneo for their superb guidance, insightful comments and attentive reading of my work. I also thank Patricia D'Antonio, Julie Fairman, Barbara Brush, Betsy Weiss, Linda Cook, Eileen Sullivan and Terry Richmond for their comments and support. From the Department of the History and Sociology of Science, I am particularly indebted to Henrika Kuklick and Charles Rosenberg for their generous advice, and I thank Hans Pols for his support.

-11-

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