Encyclopedia of American Folk Art

By Gerard C.Wertkin; Lee Kogan | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Hill, Joyce. "Cross Currents: Faces, Figureheads, and Scrimshaw Fancies." The Clarion, vol. 9 (spring/summer 1984): 25-32.
Stoddard, Dorris. "Frederick Mayhew, Limner: Chilmark's Little Known Artist." Dukes County Intelligencer, vol. 28 (1986): 10-17.
Thomas, Andrew L. "Frederick Mayhew, 'Limner': Portraits of Early-Nineteenth-Century New Bedford and Martha's Vineyard." Painting and Portrait Making in the American Northeast, Annual Proceedings of the Dublin Seminar for New England Folk-life, vol. 19 (1994): 98-106.

CHARLOTTE EMANS MOORE


MCCARTHY, JUSTIN (1892-1977)

was a prolific, complex, and enigmatic Pennsylvania artist who experimented with many different styles and subjects. He painted a wide variety of subjects over a fifty-year period. Movie stars, fashion models, sports figures, flowers, vegetables, and historic and biblical events all interested this prolific self-taught painter. Elements of fantasy that he found in everyday life appealed to McCarthy, and themes such as glamour, energy, and reverence, as well as satirical social commentary, all found a place in his work.

Owing to the deaths of his younger brother in 1907 and his father the following year, his failed attempt to earn a law degree, and the collapse of his family's finances, McCarthy suffered a nervous breakdown. He spent the years from 1915 to 1920 in the Rittersville State Homeopathic Hospital for the Insane in Allentown, Pennsylvania. There he began drawing and painting with pencil, pen, and watercolor in 1920, signing his drawings, especially those of glamorous women, with several pseudonyms, among them "Prince Dashing."

Upon his release from the hospital, McCarthy moved back into his family home in Weatherly, Pennsylvania. He expanded his use of art materials to crayon and oils in the 1950s and 1960s, and to acrylics

Candlelight in Acapulco Ice Follies; Justin McCarthy; Weatherly, Carbon County Pennsylvania; 1964. Oil on Masonite; 23½×31

inches. Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York.

Gift of Elias Getz, 1981.7.4.

-309-

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Encyclopedia of American Folk Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Introduction xxvii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • Bibliography 75
  • C 79
  • Bibliography 107
  • Bibliography 111
  • D 113
  • Bibliography 144
  • E 145
  • Bibliography 153
  • F 161
  • Bibliography 166
  • Bibliography 171
  • G 189
  • Bibliography 203
  • Bibliography 210
  • H 217
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 235
  • I 247
  • Bibliography 249
  • J 251
  • K 269
  • Bibliography 273
  • L 279
  • M 293
  • Bibliography 309
  • Bibliography 311
  • N 337
  • O 349
  • P 355
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 411
  • R 421
  • Bibliography 433
  • S 447
  • Bibliography 450
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 484
  • Bibliography 490
  • Bibliography 494
  • Bibliography 496
  • T 509
  • U 527
  • V 529
  • W 539
  • Bibliography 540
  • Bibliography 546
  • Bibliography 556
  • Y 561
  • Index 569
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