Novel Possibilities: Fiction and the Formation of Early Victorian Culture

By Joseph W. Childers | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Although we often hear that writing is a lonely occupation, in trying to thank everyone who helped bring this book to fruition, I realize that I, at least, almost never wrote alone. I have benefitted immeasurably from mentors and colleagues who have generously offered their time and advice. This project began as a dissertation at Columbia University, where I was fortunate to have the support and direction of Steven Marcus, who encouraged my desire to become familiar with the "extra-literary" aspects of the Victorian period. I am indebted to Edward Said, Jonathan Arac, John Rosenberg, Howard Horwitz, Andreas Huyssen, Charlotte Bonica, and the late Alice Fredman for at one time or another agreeing to read -- or more selflessly, listen to -- early versions of parts of this book. I owe much to the Critical Texts collective for providing a stimulating intellectual community at Columbia and to Charles Biggs, Jon Anderson, and Richard Moye for their willingness to read and comment on my work at any time.

I am extremely grateful to the University of California Dickens Project for allowing me to present portions of this book at two of the Project's annual conferences. I have profited enormously from my conversations with Catherine Gallagher, Hilary Schor, Regenia Gagnier, Martha Vicinus, Fred Kaplan, Murray Baumgarten, John Jordan, Robert Newsom, Peter Logan, Gerhard Joseph, and Robert Polhemus. Of my colleagues at UC, Riverside, Peter Mileur, John Ganim, Ralph Hanna, Carole-Anne Tyler, Traise Yamamoto, Carlton Smith, George Haggerty, Katherine Kinney, Ruth ApRoberts, Edwin Eigner, and Parama Roy have all read large sections of different drafts of Novel Possibilities, and their criticism has been most constructive. I especially want to thank Deirdre David, whose reading of an early version of this book helped me to rethink its presentation and its scope, and Helena Michie, who offered me encouragement and insightful suggestions while I was in the midst of that rethinking. I am also grateful to Robert Patten and James Buzard, whose thoughtful commentaries on the entire manuscript contributed to making this a better book now than it was when it first landed on their desks.

The University of California at Riverside Committee on Research has

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Novel Possibilities: Fiction and the Formation of Early Victorian Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.