Politics and World Oil Economics: An Account of the International Oil Industry in Its Political Environment

By J. E. Hartshorn | Go to book overview

Foreword

THIS book looks at the kaleidoscopic international circumstances of an industry in course of change: it is of necessity impressionistic and selective. For ease of reading, I have avoided footnotes and kept tables within the text to a minimum; but a short bibliography, a few maps and charts, and some pages of salient statistics about oil are appended.

For current detail I have depended heavily upon the industry's outstanding trade journals -- the Petroleum Press Service and Petroleum Times in Britain; the Oil and Gas Journal, World Petroleum and the late Petroleum Week in the United States: Petrole Informations in France. I have used figures of petroleum both in the terminology of 'tons a year' that is often used on this side of the Atlantic, and that of 'barrels a day' that is used almost invariably in the United States and Middle East. In the simple rule of thumb of the trade, a barrel of oil a day roughly equals 50 tons of oil a year.

My personal acknowledgments are legion. Any understanding of the oil industry in the pages that follow has been gained from the extraordinarily patient explanation of friends in the companies, the governments, and among the consultants and commentators who serve the industry: I am indebted to them for hospitality, time, and argument. But the book is not sponsored by any company, government, or other interest: and its conclusions are entirely my own. Any understanding of business behaviour in general that I have been able to bring to this business has been gained in the service and the companionship of The Economist newspaper.

The mistakes may be legion too. Only those are wholly mine.

J.E.H.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics and World Oil Economics: An Account of the International Oil Industry in Its Political Environment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 365

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.