Politics and World Oil Economics: An Account of the International Oil Industry in Its Political Environment

By J. E. Hartshorn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII Oil Companies as Taxpayers

S o far as possible, up to here, this book has sketched the behaviour of the oil business in an unreal isolation, as if oil companies lived and worked in a grey, neutral, logical world of economic men without a country. Some oilmen, perhaps, sometimes wish they did; and certainly this is as international an industry as has ever been built up. But for writer and reader the device has been one simply of convenience -- to trace some outlines of an industry that is complex enough in all conscience even before one pins the tracing back where it belongs, across a rich and colourful map of nations. Put back in their proper place, the outlines are harder to follow. They are almost lost within a more turbulent pattern, as the colours of nationalism show through.

The international sweep of this industry does not absolve it from living with governments, as every other industry has to; it only introduces the complication, which can have advantages but has disadvantages as well, of living with more governments than one. The oil industry is incessantly engaged in trade by sea and across frontiers, but its movement of bulk cargo around the world is only one of the simpler among its operations. It explores and produces, usually, on land: even offshore, it has not yet ventured far out beyond territorial limits. It processes and sells its products almost entirely for use inside national frontiers. Its relations with the governments of the lands where it does business vary according to the kind of society concerned and with oil's importance to any given economy. But the fact that an oil company is often not operating in one country alone, and may have a world-wide scatter of interests, tends to complicate the industry's relationship with each individual government.

Primary in every such relationship is the oil industry's role as a taxpayer of each country of which it is a commercial citizen. This is indeed the point where discussion of the industry's economic behaviour in

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics and World Oil Economics: An Account of the International Oil Industry in Its Political Environment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 365

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.