Quest for the Presidency, 1992

By Peter L. Goldman; Thomas M. Defrank et al. | Go to book overview

5.
Waiting for Godot

T o one veteran Democratic strategist, the field of candidates assembling for the primaries in the fall of 1991 looked like the missingman formation flown over Air Force funerals: there was a hole against the sky where a lost hero ought to have been. On paper, the six contenders might have been an admirable panel for a debate on the future of their party after a quarter-century wandering in the desert. They embodied every important shading of Democratic belief from conservative to moderate to liberal to neo-nihilist -- the view, championed by former governor Jerry Brown of California, that the salvation of the party of Jefferson, Jackson, and Franklin Roosevelt lay in blowing it up and starting all over again.

And yet, in the days before Bill Clinton emerged as a dominant force, they seemed to be men of the most ordinary clay; each, indeed, had been drawn into the race in part by the conviction that the others looked so eminently beatable. The party's marquee-name politicians had fled to their bunkers at the sight of Bush's postwar poll ratings, never imagining that he could slide so far so fast. Of those who actually did take the field, only Brown was well-known, and for all the wrong reasons. He had reigned over the nation-state of California with some success for eight years and had twice before run for president, each time stirring a flutter of excitement. But he was most famous for his idiosyncrasies, a quirkiness of style and mind that had got him inseparably stuck with the nickname Governor Moonbeam.

The others had almost no public profiles at all -- not, in any case, on a national stage. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska was a first-term senator with his own ethereal modes of life and thought; Governor Moonbeam, meet Cosmic Bob. Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa was an antique, a '30s-style farmer-labor populist confined to the back benches by his retro politics and his thumb-in-your-eye attitude. Paul Tsongas had been a senator, too, until a siege of cancer had forced him home to get well and make money; he was remembered, if at all, as a thoughtful but somewhat mousy man, Elmer Fudd with a public-policy agenda,

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Quest for the Presidency, 1992
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 758

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.