Quest for the Presidency, 1992

By Peter L. Goldman; Thomas M. Defrank et al. | Go to book overview

14.
Where Was George?

The president was dressing for a speech to a $1,000-a-chicken-breast fund-raising dinner in Houston on Halloween, 1991 when his press secretary, Marlin Fitzwater , sent him a story from the day's harvest of wire-service cuttings. Bush scanned it. He had taken yet another partisan shot, this one from Senate Democratic leader George Mitchell, for his seemingly untroubled view of America's economic distress. The charge that he was doing too little to put things right was routine stuff, even for a man as thin-skinned as the president; the bolder of his advisers were telling him as much, in terms more polite but no less urgent. What put Senator Mitchell's comments over the top was that he had likened Bush to Herbert Hoover.

Till then, Bush had ignored repeated warnings to come out fighting for his presidency or risk losing it; it was a measure of his resistance, and his team's growing frustration, that they felt it necessary to use guile to move him where open diplomacy had failed. This time, the ploy worked. The president was steaming nicely when he and Fitzwater encountered one another an hour later in a holding room at the Sheraton Astrodome hotel.

"Well, Marlin," Bush said, his smile veiling his anger, "you're trying to cause trouble by showing me this before dinner."

"I was trying to get you fired up, sir," Fitzwater answered, smiling back.

"One of these days, we're gonna have to get into this," Bush said, heading for the dais.

By "this," he meant politics, and he did get into it for one rare time that night, to electric effect. The event, before he went on, had bordered on disaster. The night was cold, the local economy sour, and enthusiasm low for writing checks to the homeboy president. A large empty space yawned at one end of the ballroom, where a dozen tables had gone unsold, and the open display of passion was as wanting as at a symposium on semiotics. The audience barely feigned interest in the warm-up speeches. "It's called quiet confidence," a young advance

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Quest for the Presidency, 1992
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 758

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.