Law Observance: Shall the People of the United States Uphold the Constitution?

By W. Durant C. | Go to book overview

THE PRESIDENT, CHIEF ENFORCER

Brantley W. Dobbins District Attorney, Solano County, Fairfield, Calif.

IN my opinion, based upon six years' experience as district attorney in one of the counties of the State of California, the present law designed for the enforcement of the 18th Amendment would have been adequate to meet the conditions existing if law enforcement had been kept out of politics and so-called substantial citizens of the respective communities had observed and encouraged its enforcement.

In order to overcome this condition now existing, I believe the President of the United States must first openly take his stand for prohibition and law enforcement. He must let it be known to the citizens of our country, first that he personally observes the law to the limit in this respect and, secondly, that its enforcement must be responsive to him directly. In order to accomplish this, I recommend the following changes:


Prohibition Police Courts

1. The transfer of the unit for the enforcement of the 18th Amendment from the Treasury Department to the Department of Justice. The creation within the Department of Justice of a Prohibition Unit under the direction and supervision of a Prohibition Director to be appointed by the Attorney-General, with the approval of the President, this Prohibition Director to be removable, of course, upon the direct order of the President.

2. The creation within the division of each United States district court of a lower court to be known as a prohibition police court, which would have original jurisdiction over all cases of possession, sale, transportation and manufacture of liquor for first offenders. This court to have a limit

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