Man, Time, and Fossils: The Story of Evolution

By Ruth Moore | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THERE was only one way in which I could approach the writing of a book on a subject so deep, so moving, and so all- encompassing as the evolution of man. That was as a reporter. The function of a reporter is to tell about, and in one sense to interpret, the work of the expert for the layman. In this case that was an unequaled assignment.

These were men reaching out for the widest understandings of which we are capable. They have tried to understand and explain the majestic course of life. They have experimented to that end. They have dug into the earth in a search for our earliest forebears, and they have brought the clear light of mathematics to bear upon this infinite and yet nearest problem. To work with material of this magnificent scope was both exciting and humbling. As the late learned Prime Minister of the Union of South Africa, Field Marshal Jan C. Smuts, said: "The story of the evolution of life on this globe is perhaps the most enthralling in all science."

To tell this story I have drawn on the work of many scientists. I have extensively used their own writings and what others have written about them. For the story of the recent developments that have brought a new surge of progress in the study of evolution and have changed many past concepts, I have tried, whenever possible, to talk to the men who were doing the work.

I should like to express my appreciation particularly to Dr. Sherwood L. Washburn, of the University of Chicago. Without his assistance and guidance the writing of this book would have been an almost impossible task. It was heartening too to discover that he did not quail at the idea of the story of evolution being written by a reporter for people generally. I

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Time, and Fossils: The Story of Evolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.