FEELING VERSUS INTELLECT.

IN the early days of my friendship with Prof. Huxley--I think about 1854--an afternoon call on him quickly brought the suggestion--"Come upstairs; I want to show you something which will delight you--a fact that goes slick through a great generalization!" His ironical expression was prompted by his consciousness that being so much given to generalizing I should be disconcerted. He was dissecting the brain of a porpoise, and the anomalous fact he pointed out was that the porpoise has a brain of relatively immense size--a size seemingly out of all relation to the creature's needs. What can an animal leading so simple a life want with an organ almost large enough to carry on the life of a human being? Huxley (not then professor) had no solution of the difficulty to offer, and at the time there did not occur to me what I believe to be the solution.

There has grown up universally an identification of mind with intelligence. Partly because the guidance of our actions by thought is so conspicious, and partly because speech, which occupies so large a space in our lives, is a vehicle that makes thought pre

-35-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Facts and Comments. - A Business-Principle 1
  • A Problem. 12
  • A New Americanisms. 16
  • Presence of Mind. 19
  • The Corruption of Music 26
  • Spontaneous Reform. 29
  • Feeling Versus Intellect. 35
  • The Purpose of Art. 44
  • Some Questions. 49
  • The Origin of Music. 52
  • Developed Music 61
  • Estimates of Men. 79
  • State-Education. 82
  • The Closing Hours. 94
  • Style. 97
  • Style Continued. 106
  • Meyerbeer 112
  • The Pursuit of Prettiness. 116
  • Patriotism. 122
  • Some Light on Use-Inheritance. 128
  • Party-Government. 135
  • Exaggerations and Mis-Statements. 145
  • Imperialism and Slavery. 157
  • Re-Barbarization. 172
  • Regimentation. 189
  • Weather Forecasts. 201
  • The Regressive Multiplication Of Causes. 210
  • Sanitation in Theory And Practice. 216
  • Gymnastics. 225
  • Euthanasia. 231
  • The Reform of Company--Law. 234
  • Some Musical Heresies. 245
  • Distinguished Dissenters. 258
  • Barbaric Art. 265
  • Vaccination. 270
  • Perverted History. 274
  • Grammar. 280
  • What Should the Sceptic Say To Believers? 292
  • Ultimate Questions. 300
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