SANITATION IN THEORY AND PRACTICE.

AFTER lying unused for nearly fifty years, an almost forgotten incident will serve to introduce some comments on the doings of our guardians of the public health. It occurred at a little dinner given by a friend, long since deceased without leaving descendants, Mr. F. O. Ward, active in the sanitary agitation then carried on, and, I believe, a writer of occasional leaders on water-supply and other such matters in The Times. He was an enthusiast and soon found occasion to bring up his favourite topic. The form his talk took was an unstinted laudation of his friend Edwin Chadwick, the leader of the movement; and the particular trait singled out for praise was his perseverance in carrying out vast investigations. One illustration given was that if he needed proof of some point in his case, he instructed a man to examine and report, and if the man did not bring back the evidence he desired, he sent him about his business and dispatched another; meting out like measure to him too, if he failed to furnish statements of the required kind; and so on, and so on,

-216-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Facts and Comments. - A Business-Principle 1
  • A Problem. 12
  • A New Americanisms. 16
  • Presence of Mind. 19
  • The Corruption of Music 26
  • Spontaneous Reform. 29
  • Feeling Versus Intellect. 35
  • The Purpose of Art. 44
  • Some Questions. 49
  • The Origin of Music. 52
  • Developed Music 61
  • Estimates of Men. 79
  • State-Education. 82
  • The Closing Hours. 94
  • Style. 97
  • Style Continued. 106
  • Meyerbeer 112
  • The Pursuit of Prettiness. 116
  • Patriotism. 122
  • Some Light on Use-Inheritance. 128
  • Party-Government. 135
  • Exaggerations and Mis-Statements. 145
  • Imperialism and Slavery. 157
  • Re-Barbarization. 172
  • Regimentation. 189
  • Weather Forecasts. 201
  • The Regressive Multiplication Of Causes. 210
  • Sanitation in Theory And Practice. 216
  • Gymnastics. 225
  • Euthanasia. 231
  • The Reform of Company--Law. 234
  • Some Musical Heresies. 245
  • Distinguished Dissenters. 258
  • Barbaric Art. 265
  • Vaccination. 270
  • Perverted History. 274
  • Grammar. 280
  • What Should the Sceptic Say To Believers? 292
  • Ultimate Questions. 300
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