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Theodore Roosevelt and His Time Shown in His Own Letters - Vol. 1

By Joseph Bucklin Bishop | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXI
RUSSO-JAPANESE PEACE CONFERENCE

THE "crowded" year supreme of Roosevelt's official life was unquestionably that of 1905. In no other does the record of his activity and achievement stand so high; in no other did he exemplify more completely the dictum of Henry Adams that he was "pure act." He arranged, directed and brought to a successful conclusion the Ports- mouth Peace Conference which put an end to the war between Japan and Russia. He arranged also the Algeciras Convention which resulted, in 1906, in preventing war between France and Germany over possessions in Morocco. He took charge of affairs in Santo Domingo and, in the railure of the Senate to act, brought about a peaceful solution of the troubles between that island and its foreign creditors. He personally directed the vast amount of official business connected with the task of getting the machinery of organization in motion for building the Panama Canal. These were the dominating items in the record of his year's activity. There were many of less magnitude which will be mentioned in the course of this narrative.

The crowning achievement of the year was, of course, the ending of the war between Russia and Japan. The broad outlines of the methods which Roosevelt pursued in accomplishing this memorable result are matters of common knowledge, but the inner history of the incident has never been revealed. For the first time it is now accessible to his biographer in Roosevelt's official and private correspondence, and can, not improperly, be laid before the world. As it is told in that correspondence, it is virtually his own story of what he did, illuminated with expositions of his own views and motives at the time, and with his own esti

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