Social New York under the Georges, 1714-1776: Houses, Streets, and Country Homes, with Chapters on Fashions, Furniture, China, Plate, and Manners

By Esther Singleton | Go to book overview

III
TEA-POTS, URNS AND SPOONS

BESIDES the plate imported from France, England and Holland, a considerable quantity was manufactured here. On the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, many of the best workers in the precious metals left France and settled in Holland, Germany and England. Not a few crossed the Atlantic. The names of the silversmiths who were freemen of New York from the close of the Seventeenth Century till the Revolution were as follows: Everardus Bogardus, Ahasuerus Kendrick, Cornelis Kiersteade and Benjamin Wyncoope ( 1698); Richard Overin and Jacob Vanderspiegel ( 1701); Benjamin Kip ( 1702); Bartolo Schaats ( I 708); Cornelis Cornelison ( 1712); Coenraet Ten Eyck ( 1716); Peter Vergereau ( 1721); Samuel Broadhurst ( 1725); John Hastier ( 1726); Cornelius Wynkoop ( 1727); Stephen Bourdet ( 1730); John.Brevoort ( 1742); Silvester Morris ( 1759); John Burt Lyng and John Heath ( 1761); Joshua Slydell and William Grigg ( 1765); Walter Thomas ( 1769); and John Rominie ( 1770).

It will be noticed that some of the above names are unmistakably Huguenot, while others are English and Dutch. Besides these freemen, other silversmiths kept shops in New York and advertised in the papers. In 1767, Cary Dunn was in New Dutch Church

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