Social New York under the Georges, 1714-1776: Houses, Streets, and Country Homes, with Chapters on Fashions, Furniture, China, Plate, and Manners

By Esther Singleton | Go to book overview
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II
THE CLOTHES MEN WORE

AND now, if it be asked how our exquisite, who, until 1749, was known as a "Fribble," was dressed, we shall have to note that about 1727-1730 he wore black velvet breeches, a Ramilies wig, a coat that fitted very smartly and was buttoned tightly at the waist, trimmed with lace, and open from the neck to the waist to show the lace ruffles beneath it. He had an array of buttons, his sleeve was finished with a deep cuff, and his wrists were adorned with ruffles. His waistcoat was long, and adorned with buttons and flaps. His shoes were gay with red heels, his silk stockings had gold clocks, his hat was a cocked beaver, and he wore a sword and carried a cane decorated with tassels.

The clothes that Gov. Montgomerie wore conformed to the above in every detail. Among them were cambric ruffled shirts, dimity vests, a scarlet coat and breeches trimmed with gold lace, a cloth suit with open silver lace, silk stockings with clocks, a gold-headed cane, and several wigs.

A few years later, the coat had grown longer, reaching to the calf of the leg, fitting as tightly at the waist as ever, and just as profusely adorned with buttons. The cuff, now somewhat smaller at the wrist, reached to the elbow, and a broad collar turned

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Social New York under the Georges, 1714-1776: Houses, Streets, and Country Homes, with Chapters on Fashions, Furniture, China, Plate, and Manners
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