Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview
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THE FUNCTIONS OF THE GOVERNING BOARD IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF A UNIVERSITY

WILLIAM L. ABBOTT, M.E. Trustee, University of Illinois

College professors have written much concerning the functions of trustees in university administration; the more they have written the more those functions have shrunk, the trustee having been ignored in the discussion until now, as his duties approach the vanishing point, I am asked to embalm myself into the record, presumably as a museum specimen of a species that is fast becoming atrophied, and, although I may miss the point of the discussion, I shall at least speak my mind.

The constructive potentiality of a people is indicated by its enterprise and by its ability to organize so as to function as a unit for the accomplishment of any desired purpose. Long human experience in such matters has shown that certain forms of organization tend to efficiency and other forms to inefficiency, one of the lessons taught being that when a large number of people desire to establish and carry on an enterprise it can best be done by creating a body or corporation for that purpose and placing its management in the hands of a selected few, giving this smaller body general instructions as to the object to be accomplished, full authority to represent the larger, and charging it with complete responsibility for the organization and conduct of the undertaking. Not that the members of this smaller number, whom we will call the governing board, are the most experienced in the particular undertaking to which they are assigned, but that they have the interest of the venture at heart and

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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