Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview

THE UNIVERSITY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

SIR ROBERT A. FALCONER, LL.D., D.LITT., C.M.G. President of the University of Toronto

Recently the Educational Supplement to the London Times advocated "a League of Universities as the best means of creating that mutual knowledge and respect which is a condition precedent to a working League of Nations." The writer supports his advocacy by recalling the fact that "in the days of Innocent III, when the idea of a unified Europe was regarded as something more than a potentiality of civilization, a single system of education dominated by what was virtually a league of universities was one of the main forces of unity." Before the war there was a real intercourse between the universities and the learned and scientific societies of the world, which found formal expression in the brilliant international gatherings that met frequently to celebrate some important anniversary in the history of the university -- as for example at Edinburgh, Bologna, Berlin, Cambridge, Leipzig, and, immediately before the outbreak of the War, at Groningen. Though this last function was graced by the Royal presence, probably the most memorable incident was the rising in a body of the professors of the German universities clad in their rich official costume, both impressive and confident, but within a month overthrown from their intellectual eminence among the universities of Christendom.

In that day of the world's need, when civilization was straining and creaking, their prejudiced nationalism was a disruptive force that rent in twain the common-

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Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton
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