Educational Problems in College and University: Addresses Delivered at the Educational Conference Held at the University of Michigan, October Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of President Marion Leroy Burton

By John Brumm Lewis | Go to book overview
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THE JUNIOR COLLEGE MOVEMENT

A. ROSS HILL, PH.D., LL.D. President of the University of Missouri

It seems difficult to determine just when the idea of the junior college was first suggested, but it probably occurred at an earlier date than most of us have supposed. In his inaugural address as President of the University of Minnesota, Col. Folwell suggested that ultimately the secondary schools in the larger centers of population might well undertake the work of the freshman and sophomore years in the university. One might make a case for the claim that in several of the early state systems of education there was contemplated the existence of institutions, public or private, that should do the work now being attempted by junior colleges, that is, supplement the general training of the secondary schools and prepare students for specialization in the professional and advanced schools of the university. Notably the educational system of Virginia as conceived in the original plans for the University of Virginia, and the first education act of Missouri, contemplated a number of collegiate institutions that would connect the public schools with the university, but these middle schools were not established. But in these early suggestions there was no clear recognition of the junior college as an institution, and it is probably safe to say that it first secured public recognition as an essential contribution to our educational machinery through President W. R. Harper and the early organization of the the University of Chicago, with its somewhat sharp distinction between

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