Lincoln Day by Day: A Chronology, 1809-1865 - Vol. 2

By Earl Schenck Miers; William E. Baringer | Go to book overview

1849

JANUARY 1. Washington. Lincoln writes draft to Robert Irwin for $4.22 to balance account. Irwin Ledger.

JANUARY 2. House considers bill to supply deficiencies in appropriations for year ending June 30th. Amendment is proposed allowing sergeant-at- arms clerk at $4 day provided office is deprived of messenger. Lincoln votes to strike out proviso. Motion carries. He votes aye on amendment, which carries. Globe.

JANUARY 3. Lincoln votes to table resolution whereby House would purchase copies of The Constitution, by William Hickey, to be distributed to libraries and institutions. Motion carries. He votes to table resolution criticizing secretary of treasury for method of administering Tariff of 1848. Resolution is tabled. Ibid.

JANUARY 4. Lincoln votes against reconsideration of vote whereby President's message was referred to select committee. He votes aye on resolution to raise mileage allowance of "Persons appointed to deliver the votes for President and Vice President . . . to the President of the Senate" from 12½ cents to 25 cents per mile. It is passed 114-62. Ibid. At War Department he swears to facts re Joseph Newman, Mexican War Casualty. CW, II, 18.

JANUARY 5. Lincoln writes to Walter Davis of Springfield: "When I last saw you I said, that if the distribution of the offices should fall into my hands, you should have something; and I now say as much, but can say no more." In letter to Herndon he denies that he has promised Davis post office, but reiterates his intention to help him obtain "something" if he can. He enjoys himself writing to collector who wants his autograph and "a sentiment." Lincoln says he is not sentimental, and best sentiment he can think of is "that if you collect the signatures of all persons who are no less distinguished than I, you will have a very undistinguishing mass of names." CW, II, 18-9.

JANUARY 6. After acrimonious sectional debate, House votes on committee report favoring bill granting $1,000 compensation to slaveowner whose slave, joining Florida Indians in 1835, was captured by U.S. troops and sent west. Vote is close, and speaker and clerk disagree on count. Lincoln votes nay and asks how his vote was recorded. Globe; CW, II, 19.

JANUARY 8. "Mr. Lincoln gave notice . . . for leave to introduce a bill in relation to school lands which may have been or may be relinquished."

-3-

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Lincoln Day by Day: A Chronology, 1809-1865 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Committee iv
  • Lincoln Sesquicentennial Commission v
  • Location Symbols vii
  • Abbreviation of Sources viii
  • 1849 3
  • 1851 46
  • 1852 67
  • 1854 90
  • 1855 136
  • 1857 187
  • 1859 207
  • Glossary of Legal Terms 305
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