Mr. Franklin: A Selection from His Personal Letters

By Leonard W. Labaree; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

ately dutifull and attentive to every thing that can be agreeable to me; with three very promising Grandsons, in whom I take great Delight So that were it not for our Publick Troubles, and the being absent from so many that I love in England, my present Felicity would be as perfect, as in this World one could well expect it. I enjoy however, what there is of it while it lasts, mindfull at the same time that its Continuance is like other earthly Goods, uncertain. Adieu my dear Friend, and believe me ever, with sincere and great Esteem

Yours most Affectionately

B. Franklin

My respectfull Complts. to Mrs. Shipley.

Your Health on this side the Water is every where drank by the Name of THE Bishop.

I send for your Amusement a Parcel of our Newspapers. When you have perused them, please to give them to Mr. Hartley of Golden Square.


HOW TO PAY FOR A WAR

IN the autumn of 1775 Congress appointed Franklin one of a committee of three to go to Washington's headquarters at Cambridge, Massachusetts, to confer with the Commander-in-chief on the problem of supporting and regulating the Continental Army. From Cambridge he wrote back to his son-in-law Richard Bache in Philadelphia. On his return home, Franklin explained, he would call for his sister Jane Mecom, who had fled from Boston to friends in Rhode Island at the beginning of the siege. Then, turning to the subject of war, Franklin commented on the spirit of the people at Boston, and, in characteristic fashion, worked out arithmetically a way to finance its costs.

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