Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Daily Life in the Time of Homer

By Emile Mireaux; Iris Sells | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE MANOR HOUSE

HOMERIC society was an aristocratic society. If our dates are correct, Homeric poetry saw the light and developed in the historical environment which took shape after the decline and fall of most of the traditional monarchies. These monarchies were the self-styled heirs of the heroic age and some of them, notably in Asia, claimed descent from the Achaean heroes, Agamemnon, Menelaus and Nestor; while others, as successors of the Dorian invasion, claimed to descend from Heracles. By the middle of the eighth century they had all foundered.

The aristocracy which seized power at this moment in most of the Greek cities was called the kingly class and consisted of the old families whose influence and wealth had been for long principally based on their possession of vast landed estates; in addition to their share of the public receipts as city magistrates and to the exploitation of certain prosperous sanctuaries. After taking over the reins of government from the ancient dynasties, the aristocracy continued to expand its activities, adding to the prestige of noble birth that of an aristocracy of wealth.

In the first place it derived its wealth from the success of its industrial undertakings. The older classes of artisans were left to pursue their traditional employments, the potters continuing to make their earthen vases, and the smelters the household utensils, tripods and copper and iron receptacles; and so also the ironforgers continued to produce agricultural tools and some of the swords; while the carpenters went on making furniture and wooden frames. The aristocracy, leaving these artisans to their several trades, set up the great industries for mass production, particularly of weapons of war but also of many smaller manufactured articles, products of the vast foundries that were built to

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daily Life in the Time of Homer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.