Daily Life in the Time of Homer

By Emile Mireaux; Iris Sells | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
PEASANTS AND SOLDIERS

THE structure of the Homeric states, in spite of the increasing changes brought about by industrial and commercial expansion, remained none the less solidly based on the old rural traditions.

This state of equilibrium was to some extent jeopardized by the rapid rise to wealth of a section of the great aristocratic families: these were now in possession of political power and they continued to control their own class-group, that of the hereditary nobility, within the solid structure of the gené. The balance was also disturbed by the increase in population, not always accompanied by an improvement in material conditions, for the increase mainly affected the populace. This section contained many heterogeneous elements, including the free artisans, the agricultural labourers, the smaller landholders, not to mention the members of the servant and slave classes.

Nevertheless, the equilibrium of the state was still assured by the existence of one very important class, which enjoyed material and moral autonomy and was justly proud of the privilege. Its economic independence was based on landownership, for it was a race of peasants. Its social standing was due to the right of taking part in the popular assembly and, in consequence, of holding the rank of citizens. And its prestige was further enhanced by the right of bearing arms, because it was from this class that the phalanx of heavy-armed infantry, which formed the bulk of the army, was recruited. It was therefore a military class.

The mode and conditions of peasant life varied from country to country and from city to city. In general, a preoccupation with land was the dominant interest; but it might happen that military interests so far predominated that the landholder disdained his

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daily Life in the Time of Homer
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.