An Introduction to Family Therapy: Systemic Theory and Practice

By Rudi Dallos; Ros Draper | Go to book overview

Preface

We are delighted that in writing the second edition we have realized our aim with the first edition of this text, which was to create, from a British perspective, a resource book for ourselves, our colleagues, experienced and new practitioners in the field of systemic family therapy and practice as we approached the end of the second millennium. In the second edition we hope to enable readers to keep up to date.

There is already a rich oral and literary tradition in systemic and family therapy so this book is part story, part chronicle: story, because we describe a series of events and intend to interest and even amuse the reader with our personal descriptions of the complex field of systemic and family therapy, a fascinating variety of ideas and practice which has emerged in the last 55 years. To the extent that these pages reflect our perspectives, we can defer to modernist, postmodernist and constructionist views and, with tongue in cheek, say this book is fictitious. Equally, we claim that this book is our attempt to chronicle and record the people, ideas, practices and socio-political cultural contexts that have contributed to the field in the second half of the twentieth century and beginning of the twenty-first century. We want this second edition of the book to celebrate 55 years of development in the field and provide a useful guide for readers on all five continents that is both coherent and resourceful. Our wish is that this book, above all, be a user-friendly account that preserves important knowledge and memories of events and facts in a fascinating and developing field of inquiry and practice and is a reference book for readers.

The organization of the book reflects our attempt to offer readers a story, a chronicle and a reference book. In the first edition we divided the 55 plus years of history into a first phase, second phase and third phase and can thus locate and track people, ideas and practices as they evolve out of modernism, through postmodernism and constructivism

-xiii-

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An Introduction to Family Therapy: Systemic Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • An Introduction to Family Therapy - Systemic Theory and Practice iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures xi
  • Notes on the Authors xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Foreword xvi
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Dedication and Acknowledgements xx
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The First Phase – 1950s to Mid-1970s 17
  • 2: The Second Phase – Mid-1970s to Mid-1980s 63
  • 3: The Third Phase – Mid-1980s to 2000 91
  • 4: Ideas That Keep Knocking on the Door 125
  • 5: Systemic Formulation 151
  • 6: Current Practice Development 2000–2005 - Conversations Across the Boundaries of Models 172
  • 7: Research and Evaluation 198
  • 8: Reflections and Critique 2005 231
  • Postscripts 240
  • Topic Reading Lists 256
  • Formats for Exploration 290
  • Glossary of Terms 305
  • British Texts 310
  • References 315
  • Index 327
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