Leaders of the American Civil War: A Biographical and Historiographical Dictionary

By Charles F. Ritter; Jon L. Wakelyn | Go to book overview

STEPHEN RUSSELL MALLORY
(1811 ?–November 9, 1873)

Jon L. Wakelyn

A look through the literature written on the Confederate States Navy and its only cabinet secretary, Stephen R. Mallory, reveals an inverse proportion of scholarship to its and his importance in the South’s efforts to sustain a separate nation. The secretary had the task to construct and finance a navy almost from scratch; to govern an agency with few trained staff members; and to win the naval war on the high seas, protect the ocean coastal towns and shipping, and control the inland waterways and rivers. In order to assist the government to raise necessary funds to conduct the war, Mallory had to break the Union blockade of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast south. Also, the secretary wanted to use the Confederate States Navy to damage Northern morale and hinder the federal government from purchasing war materiel through the destruction of merchant shipping on the high seas. How and whether Mallory accomplished all of these tasks require at least some attempt to look again at this all-but-forgotten man’s extraordinary life.

Like a number of other important Confederate leaders, Mallory’s origins did not begin in the South. The record of his birth is unclear, although he probably was born on the island of Trinidad between 1811 (?) and 1813. His father Charles had been born in Reading, Connecticut, and had trained to be a civil engineer. His profession took him to many foreign postings. Ellen Russell, Stephen’s mother, came from County Waterford, in southern Ireland. Adopted at a young age by relatives who had immigrated to Trinidad, she met Charles Mallory, and they later married. They had two sons, the elder of whom died in infancy. Charles and Ellen moved often, and for a time they lived in Havanna, Cuba. Sometime around 1820, while doing a building job in Key West, Florida, the elder Mallory died, leaving Ellen to raise young Stephen. She brought him up Roman Catholic, although he would later convert to the Episcopal Church, and made certain he received a proper parochial education. She first sent him to the Jesuit school in Mobile, Alabama, and later to the Moravian School for

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leaders of the American Civil War: A Biographical and Historiographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.