The Dancer Defects: The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War

By David Caute | Go to book overview

Preface

This book started out as a larger design, embracing literature and the key academic disciplines, as well as what is to be found in these pages: theatre, film, classical and popular music, ballet, painting and sculpture, and exhibition culture. However, the available material from the United States, the Soviet Union, and Europe is so vast that my findings in the fields of fiction, literary criticism, political theory, and historiography are now scheduled for a subsequent volume.

Meanwhile, I would like to thank colleagues to whom I am indebted for advice and assistance, particularly those who have checked and corrected my translations from foreign languages. Frank Althaus, Elena Smolina, and Vera Adian provided invaluable help with Russian texts. I thank Frank for his patience and encouragement as the years passed. Elena worked miracles on my behalf in Moscow as facilitator of archival access and interpreter during film screenings at Belye Stolby, the central state film archive an hour’s dash from Moscow.

Professor Julian Graffy, of SSEES, University of London, has very kindly and beyond any call of duty supplied me with numerous videotapes of Stalin-era films, a contribution all the more generous and valuable since I ran afoul of the 1988 Copyright & Patents Act, which effectively denies freelance scholars access to video material held in educational libraries.

In Russia the following kindly offered me permission to access material, or valuable time, perspectives, and historical recall: Svetlana Dzhaforova, Naum Kleiman (director, Museum of Cinema), Vitaly Mishin (deputy director, Pushkin Museum), Alla Evgeniovna Osipenko, Lydia Romachkova (deputy director and curator of avant-garde art, Tretyakov Museum), Ekaterina Kyrilovna Simonovna (daughter of Konstantin (Kyril) Simonov), Ella and Ivan Zadorozhnyuk, and Mark Zak (deputy director of the State Institute for Film Research, NIIK).

For all manner of help, I am grateful to Sergei Bek, Nicole Boireau, Anna Caute, Colin Chambers, Michel Ciment, Jessica C. E. Gienow-Hecht, Cora Sol Goldstein, D. W. Ellwood, Ronald Hayman, J. L. Krabbendam, Marc Lazar, Alan Nadel, Nora Sayre, Giles Scott-Smith, Solomon Volkov, Peter Watson, and the late John Willett.

Not least of my debts is to my editor and copy-editor Jeff New, who subjected the text to the most expert, well informed, and scrupulous critique

-vii-

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