The Dancer Defects: The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War

By David Caute | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Note on Transliteration and Usage

I have broadly adhered to the Library of Congress Russian transliteration system, except in the many cases of well-known names familiar in other forms, e.g. Yevtushenko for Evtushenko, or the Tretyakov Gallery for Tret’iakov.

Where Russian authors have translated work listed in the Bibliography, I have used the name as published in English throughout: for example, Smelianskii is Smeliansky and Il’ia Erenburg is Ilya Ehrenburg. Where their published work cited in the Bibliography is exclusively in Russian, I have adhered to the Library of Congress system: for example, Gorodinskii. In the cases of authors with both translated and untranslated work listed, I have used the translated form in the main text—for example, Maya Turovskaya (Maia Turovskaia) and Dmitry (Dmitrii) Shostakovich.

In the case of German or French translations of Russian works, I have used the translated versions of the author’s names in the References and the Bibliography but the normal English version in the main text: for example, Pudovkin (Pudowkin), Rabin (Rabine).

Titles of Russian newspapers and magazines follow the Library of Congress system (Izvestiia), if only because sometimes more familiar versions vary (Izvestya and Izvestiya).

When quoting from any non-Russian text I have stayed with the original.

Similar problems of consistency attend English–English and American– English (for example, labour/labor or defence/defense): here I have followed OUP custom and practice which, given my own branch of the language tree, means ‘American Federation of Labor’ but ‘organized labour in the United States’.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dancer Defects: The Struggle for Cultural Supremacy during the Cold War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?