The Islamic World: Past and Present - Vol. 1

By John L. Esposito | Go to book overview

Chronology of
the Islamic World
ca. 570Muhammad born in Mecca
610Muhammad called to prophethood
622Hijrah, the migration of Muhammad and his companions from Mecca to Medina and creation of first community, marks the beginning of Islamic era
624Muslims defeat Meccans at Battle of Badr
625Meccans defeat Muslims at Battle of Uhud
627Muslims defeat Meccans at Battle of the Trench
630Muhammad conquers Mecca
632Prophet Muhammad dies; Abu Bakr becomes first caliph
634Abu Bakr dies; Umar ibn al-Khattab becomes second caliph
635Muslims conquer Jerusalem
639–642Muslims conquer Egypt
644Umar ibn al-Khattab assassinated; Uthman ibn Affan becomes third caliph
656Uthman ibn Affan assassinated; Ali ibn Abi Talib becomes fourth caliph; A’isha leads unsuccessful rebellion against Ali
661Ali ibn Abi Talib assassinated
661Mu’awiyah, founder of Umayyad dynasty, becomes caliph; moves capital to Damascus
661–750Umayyad caliphate
680–692Husayn ibn Ali leads rebellion against Umayyad caliph and is killed at Karbala, creating model of protest and suffering for Shi’is
692Dome of the Rock shrine in Jerusalem completed
711Muslim armies invade parts of the Iberian Peninsula, which became known as Andalusia
732Charles Martel of France defeats Muslims at Battle of Tours, halting Muslim advance into Europe

-xi-

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The Islamic World: Past and Present - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Islamic World - Past and Present iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Chronology of the Islamic World xi
  • Abbasid Caliphate 1
  • Glossary 197
  • People and Places 201
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