The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe

By Ian McAdam | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This study began as a doctoral thesis at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. I am grateful to my supervisor, Ronald Huebert, for his guidance, advice, and support. I would also like to thank my readers, John Baxter and Christina Luckyj, for their thorough review of the dissertation and for their valuable suggestions. After experiencing my own busy teaching schedules in the years since leaving Halifax, I have come to realize that I did not at the time properly acknowledge the effort made by these three professors; I take this opportunity to correct the oversight and express my appreciation. Since the work has, through a series of revisions, undergone substantial alterations in tone and treatment, I must add that no one can, or should, take responsibility for the final version except myself.

I would also like to thank Ingrid Hotz-Davies, fellow doctoral candidate at Dalhousie University, and Goran Stanivukovic, fellow sessional instructor at the University of Calgary, for their friendship and support over the years; both have demonstrated to me that colleagues and friends can entertain ideological differences and still respect each other's humanity, and both have offered me more love than I probably deserved.

An abridged version of Chapter 5 has previously appeared as "Carnal Identity in The Jew of Malta," in English Literary Renaissance 26, no. 1 (1996): 46-74; an earlier version of Chapter 7 has appeared as "Edward 11 and the Illusion of Integrity" in Studies in Philology 92, no. 2 (1995): 203-29.1 gratefully acknowledge permission to republish this material.

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The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Irony of Identity - Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • The Irony of Identity 11
  • 1: Introduction 13
  • 2: Dido Queen of Carthage: Tenuous Manhood 44
  • 3: Tamburlaine the Great: Tenuous Godhood 73
  • 4: Doctor Faustus: the Exorcism of God 112
  • 5: The Jew of Malta: the Failure of Carnal Identity 146
  • 6: The Massacre at Paris: the Exorcism of Machevil 175
  • 7: Edward Ii: the Illusion of Integrity 198
  • 8: Conclusion 232
  • Notes 247
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 279
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