The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe

By Ian McAdam | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

1. Stephen Greenblatt, Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980), 2.

2. Augustine, Sermon 169, quoted in Peter Brown, Religion and Society in the Age of Saint Augustine (London: Faber and Faber, 1972), 30; Greenblatt, Renaissance Self-Fashioning, 2.

3. Scott Peck, The Road Less Traveled (New York: Touchstone, 1978), 97.

4. William Kerrigan and Gordon Braden, The Idea of the Renaissance (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989), 122.

5. Pico della Mirandola, Oration on the Dignity of Man, trans. A. Robert Caponigri (Washington, D.C.: Regnery Gateway, 1956), 7–9.

6. Kerrigan and Braden, The Idea of the Renaissance, 122.

7. Patrick Grant, The Transformation of Sin: Studies in Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, and Traherne (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press; Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1974), 26.

8. Pico, Oration on the Dignity of Man, 10–11.

9. Grant, The Transformation of Sin, 38.

10. Greenblatt, Renaissance Self-Fashioning, 256, 257.

11. Catherine Belsey, The Subject of Tragedy: Identity and Difference in Renaissance Drama (London: Methuen, 1985), 223.

12. Ibid., 54.

13. Catherine Belsey, John Milton: Language, Gender, Power (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1988), 104.

14. See especially the final chapter of Jonathan Dollimore, Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology, and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984).

15. Ibid., 155.

16. Ibid., 163, 168.

17. Paul Kocher, Christopher Marlowe: A Study of His Thought, Learning, and Character (1946; reprint, New York: Russell and Russell, 1962), 4.

18. A. D. Wraight, In Search of Christopher Marlowe (London: Macdonald and Co., 1965), 5.

19. A more recent treatment of Marlowe’s religious dissidence than Kocher’s may be found in Michael Keefer’s 1604 edition of Doctor Faustus (Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press, 1991), xxii-xxxiii.

20. Charles Nicholl, The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe (New York: Harcourt Brace and Co., 1992), 129.

21. Roy Kendall, “Richard Baines and Christopher Marlowe’s Milieu,” English Literary Renaissance 24, no. 3 (1994): 525.

22. Ibid., 536.

-247-

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The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Irony of Identity - Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • The Irony of Identity 11
  • 1: Introduction 13
  • 2: Dido Queen of Carthage: Tenuous Manhood 44
  • 3: Tamburlaine the Great: Tenuous Godhood 73
  • 4: Doctor Faustus: the Exorcism of God 112
  • 5: The Jew of Malta: the Failure of Carnal Identity 146
  • 6: The Massacre at Paris: the Exorcism of Machevil 175
  • 7: Edward Ii: the Illusion of Integrity 198
  • 8: Conclusion 232
  • Notes 247
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 279
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