Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

By Edward J. Rielly | Go to book overview


INDUSTRIAL LEAGUES

Baseball, even from its early days in the middle of the nineteenth century, proved popular with people of all stripes. There was little sense of play for its own sake, however, as baseball, although entertaining for spectators, was usually associated with values like health, teamwork, and discipline. Baseball also was associated with work, and the vocabulary of work was often applied to the game by reporters and participants alike. Hard work and practice were seen as vital to success on the field of play as much as in the working world.

Many of the early teams were drawn from workplaces. The Eckford Club of Brooklyn drew its players from among the shipwrights and mechanics employed at the Henry Eckford shipyards. Several teams, including the Atlantics, consisted of players from the food trades. This alliance between the workplace and the diamond accelerated as ballplayers increasingly came from blue-collar occupations. By the early decades of the twentieth century, industrial leagues had become common, consisting of teams from companies involved in such industries as the railroad, electricity, meatpacking, and textiles.

Teams sponsored by, for example, textile companies would play each other. Companies took the games seriously, as management believed that baseball competition promoted good health, kept their workers’ minds off labor issues, and helped to integrate immigrants into the American culture. Winning was sufficiently important that teams would recruit nonemployee ringers to gain an edge, such as the Parisian Cloak Company, which paid the teenage Casey Stengel $3 per game to pitch. Women’s leagues also developed, featuring such teams as the Goodyear Girls and Westinghouse Maids. Even prisons featured teams, which would play against visiting clubs.

These sorts of teams became generically known as the industrial leagues, which remained popular even during the Depression. Their popularity remains potent even today, as the legions of workplace softball teams attest.

See also: Business; Jackson, Joseph Jefferson;
Women in Baseball.

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Baseball - An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • A 1
  • B 21
  • C 43
  • D 73
  • E 87
  • F 93
  • G 109
  • H 127
  • I 139
  • J 143
  • K 155
  • L 161
  • M 185
  • N 215
  • O 227
  • P 229
  • Q 239
  • R 241
  • S 271
  • T 293
  • U 303
  • V 309
  • W 311
  • Y 331
  • Bibliography 333
  • Index 355
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.