Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

By Edward J. Rielly | Go to book overview


KELLY, MICHAEL JOSEPH (KING)
(1857–1894)

King Kelly is usually credited with being the first true baseball superstar. He was also the subject of “Slide, Kelly, Slide,” the first baseball song to become a hit. An outstanding catcher and outfielder, Kelly combined great hitting and throwing with a certain flamboyance on and off the field. Fans loved him so much that when he was traded from Cap Anson’s Chicago White Stockings to Boston, the fans in his new city gave him a carriage and two white horses to pull it.

Kelly, son of Irish immigrants, was strikingly handsome and often appeared decked out in silk hat, ascot, patentleather shoes, and cane. Once the game started, he delighted fans with such tricks as cutting directly from first base to third if the umpire was not looking, dropping his catcher’s mask in front of a runner, or (one of his most famous ploys when taking a game off) calling out “Kelly now catching for Boston” and grabbing a pop foul. This last trick quickly led to a rules change regarding player substitutions.

Kelly played from 1878 to 1893, helped the White Stockings win five

“Kelly (C. Boston)” depicted on an Old Judge and
Gypsy Queen cigarette card, part of the Champi-
ons collection (Ann Ronan Picture Library)

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.