Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture

By Edward J. Rielly | Go to book overview


RADBOURN, CHARLES GARDNER
(OLD HOSS) (1854–1897)

Old Hoss Radboum is the quintessential old-time player, what many think of when they let their imaginations return to yesteryear: An almost superhuman player who never sat out a game; who played through injuries, sore arms, and inclement weather; whose only goal was to beat the opponent.

The figure that most stands out is 60— the number of games that Charley Radboum was credited with winning in 1884, in the era when the batter could call for a high or low pitch. Actually, Total Baseball has lowered that total to 59, but the reduction does not alter the fact that Old Hoss in 1884 had one of the greatest seasons ever for a pitcher. He won 59 while losing just 12, pitched 678 innings, struck out 441 batters, appeared in 75 games, starting 73, and completed every start. He also compiled a microscopic 1.38 ERA. As the season progressed, Radbourn found himself the only pitcher remaining on his Providence Grays and did not hesitate to start every game for much of the season. When his right arm started to hurt, as it must have under those conditions, he simply applied wet towels and went out to pitch again.

It took Radbourn only 11 seasons to win 309 games. After retirement in 1891, he ran a combination saloon–pool hall. Always a man’s man, he loved hunting, but one day in 1894 he accidentally shot himself, losing an eye and a portion of his face. Not wanting people to see him that way, he spent much of his time during his few remaining years in the pool hall’s back room.

See also: Heroes; Records Set; Statistics.

Additional Reading:

Frommer, Harvey. Primitive Baseball: The First
Quarter-Century of the National Pastime.

New York: Atheneum, 1988.

Hoist, David L. “Charles G. Radbourne [sic]:
The Greatest Pitcher of the Nineteenth Cen-
tury.” Illinois Historical Journal 81(4) (1988):
255–268.

Ivor-Campbell, Frederick. “1884: Old Hoss Rad-
bourne [sic] and the Providence Grays.” In
The National Pastime. Ed. John Thorn. New
York: Warner, 1987, pp. 156–169.

Kull, Andrew. “Baseball’s Greatest Pitcher.”
American Heritage (April-May 1985): 102–
106.

Nemec, David. The Great Encyclopedia of 19th-
century Major League Baseball.
New York:
Donald I. Fine, 1997.

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baseball: An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Baseball - An Encyclopedia of Popular Culture iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • A 1
  • B 21
  • C 43
  • D 73
  • E 87
  • F 93
  • G 109
  • H 127
  • I 139
  • J 143
  • K 155
  • L 161
  • M 185
  • N 215
  • O 227
  • P 229
  • Q 239
  • R 241
  • S 271
  • T 293
  • U 303
  • V 309
  • W 311
  • Y 331
  • Bibliography 333
  • Index 355
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.