Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook

By Christopher G. Fairburn; Kelly D. Brownell | Go to book overview

36
Personality and Eating Disorders

STEPHEN A. WONDERLICH

Clinicians, theorists, and researchers have a long-standing interest in the relationship between personality and eating disorders. While early clinical descriptions emphasized the predispositional risk of personality traits for eating disorders, more recent conceptualization and research have examined how eating disorders may modify personality traits, whether certain mechanisms increase the risk of both eating disorders and certain personality characteristics, as well as the effect of personality on clinical presentation, course, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. However, this literature continues to be plagued by conceptual and methodological problems, and debates about the nature and measurement of personality.


CONCEPTUAL AND METHODOLOGICAL DEBATE

The categorical approach to understanding personality, represented by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), has come under increasing attack as a model of personality disturbance. The main criticisms include: (1) Most empirical data suggest that personality traits and disorders are continuously distributed as dimensions rather than bimodal categories; (2) cutoff points for “diagnoses” are arbitrary; (3) inadequate agreement between different personality measures (i.e., poor convergent validity); (4) poor discriminant validity between categories, resulting in marked comorbidity; (5) personality disorder categories typically do not show stability over time; and (6) extreme heterogeneity within polythetic diagnostic concepts (e.g., the 93 possible expressions of borderline personality disorder in DSM-III-R).

Although the debate continues, there is an increasing call for different approaches to the conceptualization and measurement of personality and its disorders. The most common recommendation is to move to a dimensional trait perspective. This offers numerous advantages: (1) The dimensional model is more consistent with empirical evidence sug

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 632

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.