Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook

By Christopher G. Fairburn; Kelly D. Brownell | Go to book overview

69
A Brief History of Obesity

GEORGE A. BRAY

Past is prologue.

—WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

The further backward you look, the further forward you can see.

—SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes
but in having new eyes.

—MARCEL PROUST

In this chapter, I present highlights in the history of obesity. To do this, I first present a brief review of the major scientific advances with particular reference to obesity. Second, I indicate how these ideas have affected the understanding of obesity.


KEY DEVELOPMENTS IN SCIENCE

The Physical World

The beginning of modern science can be dated from 1450–1500 and the introduction of movable type printing by Gutenberg (Table 69.1). By 1500, printing presses were widely distributed and the classic writings were more available than ever before. Probably the major scientific development in the century following Gutenberg was the Copernican Treatise of 1543, arguing that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the universe. Late in the 16th century, Galileo took this argument to the point that the Catholic Church put him under house arrest for heresy. These early pioneers led the way to the Newtonian synthesis of the Laws of Motion in the 17th century. The Newtonian laws and the physics they spawned were followed by applications to biology and to human beings, and served us well until Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. The so-called iatromechanical schools of medicine interpreted human physiology and disease in mechanical terms.

-382-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 632

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.