Nuthin' but a "G" Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap

By Eithne Quinn | Go to book overview

Notes

1. AGANGSTA PARABLE

1. Act a Fool (Macola, 1988) was King Tee’s first album.

2. Nelson George, Hip Hop America (New York: Viking, 1998), 169.

3. Marc Spiegler, “Marketing Street Culture,” American Demographics 18, no. 2 (November 1996): 28. Early underground rap cuts for malt liquor include NWA’s 12–inch single “8 Ball” (Macola, 1987) and DMC’s ode to Olde English 800 (“Crack the quart, put it to your lip / you tilt it slightly and take a sip / now by now you should know the deal / ’cause that one sip you already feel”). Around the turn of the 1990s, southern-influenced Bay Area rapper Earl Stevens began calling himself E-40 because of his predilection for 40–0z. beers.

4. Figures from Alix Freedman, “Potent New Heileman Malt Is Brewing Fierce Industry and Social Criticism,” Wall Street Journal, 17 June 1991.

5. David Bauder, “Rap Commercials for Malt Liquor Ignite Controversy,” Associated Press, 20 November 1991.

6. John Clarke, Stuart Hall, Tony Jefferson, and Brian Roberts, “Subcultures, Cultures, and Class: A Theoretical Overview,” in Stuart Hall and Tony Jefferson, eds., Resistance Through Rituals: Youth Subcultures in Post-war Britain (London: Hutchinson, 1976), 56. Paul Willis first formulated the idea of “homology” in Profane Culture (London: Routledge/Kegan Paul, 1978), to denote the internal com-

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nuthin' but a "G" Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.