School Violence in Context: Culture, Neighborhood, Family, School, and Gender

By Rami Benbenishty; Ron Avi Astor | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

First, we want to thank the students, teachers, principals, superintendents, and the Israeli Ministry of Education for their active participation in this project. Analyses and sections of this book have been published in numerous academic journals and as scholarly chapters, foundation reports, grants, and national Israeli reports. Our co-authors on these other publications have been Anat Zeira, Amiram Vinokur, Mona Khoury-Kassabari, Ronald O. Pitner, Muhammad Haj-Yahia, Roxana Marachi, Heather Ann Meyer, Ilan Roziner, Mark Weisman, and Suzanne PerkinsHart. We have learned from each of our collaborators and thank them for their contributions. We also thank Anat Zeira, Michelle Rosemond, Susan Stone, Jikang Chen, Giovanni Arteaga, and Dianne Shammas for reading drafts of this manuscript and providing valuable feedback.

We’d like to acknowledge the countless committee reviewers in the Israeli Ministry of Education and at the University of Michigan, the anonymous reviewers of all our peer-reviewed manuscripts, and the countless graduate students and colleagues not mentioned who gave us advice throughout the project. For support of this project, we thank the Israeli Ministry of Education, the Office of the Chief Scientist (especially Nora Cohen and Zmira Mevarech), the Hebrew University, the University of Michigan, the University of Southern California, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the National Academy of Education, the Fulbright Foundation, the city of Herzliya, and the William T. Grant Foundation.

Thanks to our many friends and academic peers who have been patient with us during the countless hours we engaged in deep deliberations conducting this study and writing the book. Special thanks go to Peter K. Smith, whose work has influenced our thinking. Professor Smith has taught us so much about school violence in Europe and globally. Special thanks to Mike Furlong, who not only generously shared with us his ideas, instruments, and insights but also allowed us to use his

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