British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

exploring etc. Mr. Strange will be directed to follow and will think it his duty strictly to attend to.

We have already procured one of the completest vessels ever built here, about 300 tons burthen, and known to your Honour etc. by the name of the Betsey which is to be immediately sheathed first with plank and then with copper. All the other vessels here have been surveyed and every endeavour used without attention to expense to procure a second vessel of about 150 tons which might in every respect be adequate to the service, but hitherto none has been found possessed of such qualities as appear to us necessary. . . .

[Two small vessels of about 100 tons each are at present being built at Bombay for the East India Company. They are to be allowed to purchase one of them.]

As our plan so clearly tends to public utility we cannot have a doubt of disposition to assist us. But as we are far from wishing to trouble you with unnecessary applications you may depend upon our never addressing you excepting where money and our own exertions cannot supply our wants. . . .

Scott, Tate, and Adamson.

JAS. STRANGE.


19
INSTRUCTIONS OF RICHARD CADMAN ETCHES TO CAPTAIN NATHANIEL PORTLOCK, 3 September 17851

London.

. . . and for the future securing the trade of the continent and islands adjacent, you are to establish such factories as you shall see necessary and consistent with the safety of such settlers and your ship's company King George's Sound,2 we should presume, not only from being centrical, but in every respect consistent with the intent of forming such establishment;-but in this respect we must leave you entirely discretional.

Mr. William Wilby we have deemed perfectly qualified for such an undertaking, and he accompanies you entirely with that intent. Therefore, wherever it is necessary to establish a factory, you are to purchase of the natives such a tract of land as you shall think best suited for the purpose of trading, and for security, paying them in the most friendly and liberal manner for the same. You are then to appoint as many men as you shall deem necessary, and who shall turn out as volunteers, to be companions to Mr. Wilby; you are to give them every possible

____________________
1
Printed in F. W. Howay (ed.), The Dixon-Meares Controversy, Toronto 1929, p. 61. The Instructions to Captain Dixon were an exact copy. Cf. N. Portlock, A Voyage round the World, but more particularly to the North-West Coast of America, performed in 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788, Lond. 1789.
2
The name given by Captain Cook to Nootka Sound.

-29-

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