British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

7
TRINIDAD: LORD HOBART TO GOVERNOR SIR THOMAS HISLOP, 2 February 18041

SIR,

By my last dispatch (a duplicate of which is herewith transmitted) you will perceive the anxiety of His Majesty's Ministers to introduce into the Island of Trinidad, with the least possible delay, so much of the laws of Great Britain as may be judged expedient for the security of the persons and properties of His Majesty's subjects, and for the general advancement of the interests of the settlement.

In considering this subject, you will advert to the several constitutions under which His Majesty's settlements in America and the West Indies are governed, vizt.

1st. That which obtains in the Old Colonies; namely a Legislature consisting of the Governor as His Majesty's representative, with a Council and an Assembly.

2ndly. That which consists of a Governor and Council, without an Assembly; as was formerly the Government of the province of Quebec and is at present of the Island of Cape Breton.

3dly. That which prevails in a conquered territory governed, during His Majesty's pleasure, by its ancient laws under the sovereign authority of the King delegated to His representative the Governor, as is at present the case in the Island under your charge and in Saint Lucie.

Trinidad having by the late treaty of peace become to all intents and purposes a British island and all its inhabitants subjects of the British Crown, it is extremely desirable that a form of Government, as nearly approaching to that which subsists in His Majesty's other colonies as the situation of the settlement will admit of, should be established without delay.

It being however understood that neither the present internal circumstances of the island nor the actual state of its population will as yet warrant the formation of a House of Assembly or the general introduction of the British laws and customs as they prevail in the Old Colonies, it is essential that the measures now to be taken should have for their object the laying the foundation of the gradual advancement of the colony to such a state as will enable His Majesty in due

____________________
1
Draft in C.O. 295/8. Lord Hobart had been aide-de-camp both to Rutland and to Temple while they were Lords Lieutenant of Ireland. As a member of the Irish Privy Council ( 1789-93) he had been strongly opposed to concession. Later, with Auckland, he had played an important part in arranging the Act of Union. Between 1794 and 1798 he had been Governor of Madras. He became Secretary of State for War and the Colonies in Addington's administration in March 1801. Thomas Hislop, who had served with the infantry in the West Indies, was appointed Governor of Trinidad in 1804.

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.