British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

members of your said Executive Council, provided nevertheless that in any such case you do fully report to Us by the first convenient opportunity every such proceeding with the grounds and reasons thereof. . . .


23
MAURITIUS: LORD LIVERPOOL TO GOVERNOR ROBERT FARQUHAR, 14 February 18121

. . .The discretion which is given to the Governors of all colonial possessions in the expenditure of the public money is very limited; it extends only to those cases wherein the public interests would be prejudiced by the delay of applying for authority from the Government at home. In all other instances that authority must be indispensably required. . . .


24
MAURITIUS: LORD GODERICH TO GOVERNOR SIR WILLIAM NICOLAY, 6 November 18322

. . . In the various measures which, since my accession to office, His Majesty has been graciously pleased to adopt for improving the social institutions of the colony, one difficulty has continually recurred. It has been necessary to reconcile by the best practicable compromise, the conflicting claims of the privileged class on the one hand to an enlargement of their franchises, and of the slaves on the other, to their personal freedom. But when, as in the case of Mauritius, a large proportion of the whole population are absolutely excluded from all participation in the civil franchises of the remaining part, those franchises do not merely answer their legitimate object of preventing the encroachments of the Government, but too frequently become the most effectual obstacle to the success of every effort which the Government may make for improving the condition of the degraded majority. Inestimable as the use of such privileges may be, when invoked by those who enjoy them in defence of their property, the proprietary title which is thus protected is nothing else than the right of exacting from the great mass of the people, under the impulse

____________________
1
C.O. 168/2, p. 72. Robert Farquhar had been Lieut.-Governor of Penang and a special commissioner in charge of British claims in the Moluccas before being appointed to the newly acquired island of Mauritius in 1811. His instructions, dated 10 April 1811, are similar to those of Adam Williamson (see above, pp. 83-88). Upon his return to England in 1823 he entered Parliament, and became an object of attack by the Abolitionists, who asserted that he had been backward in suppressing the slave trade.
2
C.O. 168/17, pp. 386-8. GeneralSir William Nicolay was being sent to Mauritius as Governor to restore order and obedience following the boycott there of John Jeremie, the Abolitionist, as Procureur-Général.

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.