British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

junior servant shall apply to Government to be examined on that head, and where he shall produce the certificate of the officers ordered so to examine him of his either being perfect master of the Portuguese, or his having made a fair and adequate proficiency in the knowledge of the Cingalese language, that on the production of such certificate such junior servant be held at the end of two years to be competent to fill a situation in the immediate higher class, and in like manner in the second class where any of His Majesty's civil servants undergoing a similar examination shall appear that he has made himself thorough master of the Cingalese language, and capable of both writing and speaking it, he shall then be considered as competent at the end of six years to fill a situation in the first class.

And His Excellency as a further encouragement directs that the salary of 400 Rixdollars per month attached to the head translator of Government be excepted out of all consideration of the salary attached to any class and is competent to be held by any servant of any standing qualified by his knowledge of the languages to hold it. . . .

[Regulations follow concerning promotion, disciplinary action, sick leave with pay, and the pension fund.]


39
CEYLON: GOVERNOR MAITLAND'S INSTRUCTIONS TO THE COLLECTORS OF REVENUE, 18081

. . . The first great object of every collector is to make himself acquainted with the various districts in his province and the various headmen belonging to such districts by making frequent circuits through the whole of his province.

It is by adopting this measure alone that any collector can get at a thorough knowledge either of the real character of the headmen under him or of the real situation of the country over which he presides, and it is upon such occasions in particular that the judicial power attached to the collector ought principally to be made use of.

In all other instances generally speaking where there is a sitting magistrate and provincial judge all judicial discussions ought to be left to them; and the collector of revenue, except in very particular instances, ought not to exert such authority; but upon circuit where, from the circumstance of his being on the spot, it gives the people a facility of application and the collector an opportunity of obtaining ready information without moving the parties from the village to which they belong, it appears expedient that in this instance he ought to exercise the judicial authority vested in him and settle all such minute differences and broils as may come before him. . . .

Nor can it be too strongly stated both with a view to Government and the people governed that the collector ought in every practical

____________________
1
C.O. 54/28. Enclosed (A.8) in Maitland to Castlereagh, 17 August 1808.

-146-

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