British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
constantly in his mind the maxims of law and morality, and to assist, by his opinion and advice, in the application of them to the real business of life, who will at the same time be removed, by his peculiar position, from all temptation to pervert those maxims to purposes of chicane, fraud or oppression.It seems difficult to imagine a situation better calculated to strengthen the principles of morality, by exercising them in the solution of real and practical questions, and at the same time to avoid the mischiefs which might result from the insecure hold which those principles have hitherto acquired over the minds of the natives in general.A native who has for some years been subjected to this discipline, and who has gone through his noviciate with credit, may, I think, be very safely placed in the more arduous and responsible office of a Judge of original jurisdiction, and by such an appointment four- fifths of the salary necessary to remunerate a European Judge will be saved to the public, the honourable ambition of the upper classes of natives will be safely gratified, and the great mass of the people will be bound by ties of affection to a Government which ceases to withhold offices of power and emolument from its native subjects, as soon as they become qualified to fill them with advantage to the native community.1 . . .
42
JAVA: PROCLAMATION BY STAMFORD RAFFLES, ESTABLISHING A NEW SYSTEM OF LOCAL ADMINISTRATION, 15 October 18132
[ Batavia.]The Honourable the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has, after the most minute consideration, deemed it advisable to establish an improved system of political economy throughout the Island, with the intention of ameliorating the condition of all its inhabitants, by affording that protection to individual industry, which will ensure to every class of society the equitable and undisturbed enjoyment of the fruits of labour: and while it is confidently expected that private happiness and public prosperity will be advanced under the change of system, such alterations and amendments will be hereafter adopted as experience may suggest, or the improving habits and manners of the body of the people may require.The following principles form the basis of the new arrangements, and are made public for general information.
1. The undue influence and authority of the native Chiefs have
____________________
1
The new Instructions given to Sir Robert Wilmot Horton as Governor in 1833 followed the same form as those issued to Sir Benjamin D'Urban, pp. 115-19 above.
2
Memoir of Sir T. S. Raffles, by his widow, p. 216.

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