British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

Member of Council, be legally performed by the Governor alone, he being then the only representative of the collective body, and that his act on this point of view, is to be taken as the act of the Governor and Council. . . .


46
NEW SOUTH WALES: REPORT FROM A SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS 10 July 18121

... He is made Governor and Captain General,with the most enlarged powers, uncontrolled by any Council, with authority to pardon all offences (treason and murder excepted), to impose duties, to grant lands, and to issue colonial regulations. It is in evidence from Governor Bligh that to the breach of some of these regulations, issued at the sole will of the Governor, a punishment of 500 lashes is annexed, and to others a fine of £100. The manner in which these extensive powers have been used has not always been such as to give satisfaction to the colony; nor can it be expected that where so much authority and responsibility are thrown into the hands of one man, that his will however just, and his administration however wise, will not at times create opposition and discontent amongst men unused, in their own country, to see so great a monopoly of power. Under this impression, your Committee think it right to recommend that a Council be given to the Governor, for the purpose of sharing with him in the responsibility of the measures which they may think necessary for the security or prosperity of the colony. It may perhaps be doubted how far it will be wise to limit the authority of the Governor over a colony in which, more than any other, the Government ought to be strong and unfettered; but the views of your Committee would to some degree be obtained, even though the Council appointed had no other power than that of protesting against any measures or the Governor of which they might disapprove; and of transmitting their protests to the Secretary of State. The acquiescence of the Council would give popularity to the measure of which it approved, and its expressed disapprobation might have the effect of checking such as were evidently inexpedient.

The Governor has the power of making grants of land; and your Committee have heard with surprise that this power has, in one instance at least, been used in a manner, to say the least of it, liable to much observation. It has been stated in evidence that a grant of land, to the amount of 1,000 acres, was made by a Governor to the person appointed to succeed him, who, immediately on assuming the

____________________
1
Parl. Papers, 1812 (341), vol. ii, p. 580. This Select Committee, appointed to consider transportation, sat from February to July 1812 under the chairmanship of the Hon. George Eden.

-158-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.