British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
together with the goods and merchandizes on board the same ships and vessels, shall have the full benefit of this Act.
5
INSTRUCTIONS TO DAVID HARTLEY, 18 April 17831
Instructions for Our trusty and well-beloved David Hartley, Esqr., whom We have appointed Our Minister Plenipotentiary to trade with the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America residing at Paris. Given at Our Court at St. James's the eighteenth day of April 1783, in the twenty third year of Ourreign.
1. Having received these Our Instructions, with such other explanations on the business entrusted to your care and management as We have ordered to be given to you by Our Principal Secretary of State, you will proceed to Paris, and on your arrival, you will make known to the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the said United States residing there, that you are charged with a Commission from Us, and that you are desirous to enter with them into the consideration of the different points of business entrusted to your care; with as little delay as possible.
2. You are to treat with the said Ministers Plenipotentiary on the following points: viz.
First: for the purpose of opening the ports of Great Britain, and those of the said, United States, for mutual intercourse of trade and commerce.
Secondly: you are to treat with the said Ministers Plenipotentiary upon any arrangements of trade, on the footing of reciprocity and mutual convenience.
And finally, you are treat with the said Ministers for the purpose of concluding a definitive treaty of peace between Us and the said United States.
3. You shall, from time to time, correspond with one of Our Principal Secretaries of State, on the important points entrusted to your care, and acquaint him regularly, for Our information, with every proposal which may be made to you, in order to your receiving Our further pleasure thereupon. And you shall follow and observe such
____________________
1
Draft in F. O. 4/2. David Hartley, as M.P. for Hull from 1774 to 1780 and from 1782 to 1784, won a reputation as an opponent of the American War and of the slave trade. His friendship with Franklin and his loyalty to Rockingham and Fox caused him to be selected as plenipotentiary in Paris, where in September 1783 he and Franklin signed the Treaty of Peace between Britain and the United States. In the parallel negotiations for a reciprocal trade treaty he came near to reaching agreement with the American delegates, but a propaganda campaign in England swung the commercial interests in favour of a more restrictive policy. Aware of the change in public opinion, Fox ceased to support Hartley's proposals; and upon the fall of the Fox-North Coalition the negotiations were terminated by the Pitt Administration, and Hartley was recalled.

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.