British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

3d. Whether there can be any objection to admitting this navigation to any port in the sugar colonies where a Custom House is established.

The freight of lumber from one port to another in the same island, especially to ports lying to windward of the port of importation, would in many instances be at least equal to the freight from America, and would greatly enhance the price of so bulky a commodity to the consumer and the Committee are not aware of any benefit that would result from the limitation proposed.

Resolved, That Lord Penrhyn be requested to wait upon Lord Sydney accordingly, and to solicit that the relief which can at present be obtained may be given as speedily as possible.


9
INTERIM REPORT BY THE COMMITTEE FOR TRADE ON THE PETITION OF THE WEST INDIA COMMITTEE, 13 March 17841

Their Lordships having in obedience to His Majesty's Order of Reference of the 8th instant taken into consideration the representation on behalf of a Committee of the West India Planters and Merchants setting forth the distressed state of His Majesty's sugar colonies with respect to the intercourse between the said Islands and the United States of America under the regulations contained in His Majesty's Orders in Council of 2nd July and 26th December last.

And their Lordships having thought it proper to turn their attention first to that part of the said representation in which it is suggested that the distressed state of the sugar colonies absolutely requires that not a moment should be lost in giving them relief by allowing them a free intercourse with the United States of America by ships belonging to the subjects of the said United States. Their Lordships are of opinion that as the law now stands (by which it is enacted that not only the powers and authorities given to His Majesty thereby but all Orders issued and published in consequence thereof shall continue and be in force no longer than until the 20th of April next) no relief can be granted so as to have any effect, as any Orders given for that purpose cannot arrive in the said Islands before the said law will expire.

____________________
1
B.T.5/1, pp. 20-21. On 5 March 1784 a new Committee for Trade was apponted. Their first task was to deal with the W.I. Committee petition. Its members included Lords Sydney, Clarendon, and Grantham; Charles Jenkinson, Henry Dundas, and W. W. Grenville; with Stephen Cottrell and William Fawkener acting as Secretaries. Though Pitt was nominated to it in January 1786, it was Jenkinson who was the most zealous and influential member, and in August 1786 when the new permanent Committee of ex officio, as well as specifically nominated, members was established, he became President as Lord Hawkesbury, with Grenville as his deputy and Grey Elliott and George Chalmers among the clerks.

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