British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

about Lake Champlain; admitted that the climate is uncertain and in some years the crops fail, but Nova Scotia alone will soon be able to supply all our Islands with plenty of provisions of all kinds, viz. grain, live cattle, salted provisions and fish.

Being asked whether the people of Nova Scotia will build sloops and other small vessels and carry provisions, etc. to the West India Islands: said he had no doubt but they would--but cannot say in what time; that several ship carpenters with their crews were gone to Nova Scotia expressly for the purpose of ship building, and that many Loyalists of considerable property had expressed their desire of becoming settlers in that province with a view to follow the same business. . . .


11
WILLIAM KNOX: EVIDENCE BEFORE THE COM­ MITTEE FOR TRADE, 18 March 17841

Mr. Knox attending was called in and desired to give their Lordships any information falling within his knowledge relating to the subject under consideration, and first as to the time when it might be expected that supplies for the West India Islands might be derived from Canada and Nova Scotia, and the mode of conveyance.

Mr. Knox said he had been the person who had suggested the Regulations contained in the Orders in Council respecting American trade, and had been employed in framing the several Orders, that the objections which were urged on behalf of the West India Merchants had been all stated to him and had been fully considered prior to the issuing the Order respecting the trade between the West India Islands and the United States.

That it had been foreseen that some immediate difficulty might arise from want of the supplies which had been in course of coming down--that the war had interrupted them, but they had found means to get some supplies by prizes; and others from this country; that the great point of consideration at that time was whether the supplies proper to be allowed from the United States should be brought in American ships, or confined to ships belonging to Great Britain. The articles intended to be permitted to be brought from the United States were such as this country or Ireland could not then supply; and the remaining colonies in North America were not then in a condition to

____________________
1
B.T. 5/I, pp. 35-42. William Knox had been Colonial Agent for Georgia and East Florida, but lost that position when he wrote in defence of the Stamp Act. From 1770 to 1782 he had been Under-Secretary of State for American Affairs. He was a rigid mercantilist, who seems to have exerted considerable influence upon official policy at that time. In July 1783, at the instance of Lord North, he drew up the Order in Council excluding American shipping from the West Indies. He failed to secure re-employment under the Pitt Administration.

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.