British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
dominion of the United States of America, as Great Britain and Ireland cannot supply, and as the colonies remaining to Great Britain are not yet in a condition to supply in sufficient plenty, and at reasonable rates, be permitted to be imported from the countries under the dominion of the said United States, into Your Majesty's islands in the West Indies.
Resolution 2nd. That all goods and merchandizes, being the growth and production of Your Majesty's islands in the West Indies (except such as may be used in manufactures) be permitted to be exported for the present from any of the said islands to any of the countries under the dominion of the said United States.
Resolution 3rd. That it is not advisable for Your Majesty to comply with the request of the West India planters and merchants, by permitting the goods and merchandizes before described, to be imported to, or exported from Your Majesty's islands in the West Indies, from or to the countries under the dominion of the United States, in ships belonging to the subjects of the said United States.
Resolution 4th, That the goods and merchandizes before described be permitted to be imported and exported to and from the said islands and countries respectively by British subjects only, and in no other than British built ships, owned by Your Majesty's subjects, and navigated according to law.

The Committee in the conclusion of their report think it their duty humbly to represent to Your Majesty, that there has appeared in the course of their enquiries great reason to apprehend, that ships belonging to the subjects of the United States have been unduly registered as British ships, and admitted as such into some of the ports of Your Majesty's islands in the West Indies; and that the subjects of the said states are endeavouring to carry on a contraband commerce to some of the ports of the said islands with the produce of the countries under the dominion of the said States, to the great injury of the fair trader and of those who are inclined to support the due execution of the laws of Great Britain.


13
CAPTAIN HORATIO NELSON TO LORD SYDNEY 20 March 17851

[H.M.S.] Boreas
Basseterre Road, St. Christophers.

My LORD,

It is not to criminate any individual but to vindicate my character as an officer, from the aspersions that are thrown upon it, by the

____________________
1

C.O.152/64 (Misc. papers). Captain Nelson, who had already served in both East and West Indies, was sent in 1784 in command of H.M.S. Boreas: to St. Kitts, where public opinion was reluctant to accept the prohibition of trade with the new United

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