British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

foreign country. Nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation or importation of any articles to or from the territories of the two parties respectively, which shall not equally extend to all other nations.

But the British Government reserves to itself the right of imposing on American vessels entering into the British ports in Europe a tonnage duty equal to that which shall be payable by British vessels in the ports of America; and also such duty as may be adequate to countervail the difference of duty now payable on the importation of European and Asiatic goods, when imported into the United States in British or in American vessels.

The two parties agree to treat for the more exact equalization of the duties on the respective navigation of their subjects and people, in such manner as may be most beneficial to the two countries. The arrangements for this purpose shall be made at the same time with those mentioned at the conclusion of the twelfth article of this treaty, and are to be considered as a part thereof. In the interval it is agreed that the United States will not impose any new or additional tonnage duties on British vessels, nor increase the now-subsisting difference between the duties payable on the importation of any articles in British or in American vessels. . . .


21
WILLIAM FAWKENER TO JOHN KING 2 December 17961

SIR,

I have received and laid before the Lords of the Committee of Council for Trade and Foreign Plantations your letter of the I7th ult. enclosing an extract of a letter from Mr. President Esdaile to the Duke of Portland, dated St. Christopher's 20th Sept. 1796, informing His Grace that in the Islands of St. Christopher and Nevis, as well as all the other Windward Islands, muscovado sugar is permitted to be exported in American bottoms. And I am directed by their Lordships to observe that it is contrary to law to permit any foreign vessels

____________________
1
C.O. 5/37, Pt. II, pp. 195-6. William Fawkener was a clerk of the Privy Council in ordinary and with Stephen Cottrell (also a Privy Council clerk) was responsible for the administrative work of the Committee of the Privy Council for Trade and Plantations from its inception in 1784. When that committee was reconstituted in August 1786, Fawkener and Cottrell were reappointed, and, in view of the greatly increased work of the Committee, they were joined by Grey Elliott, 'formerly Solicitor and Clerk of the Reports to the Board of Trade and now Under-Secretary of State in the Plantation Department'. They were provided with a staff of six clerks, 'one necessary woman', and two messengers (B.T. 5/4, P. 11). John King was for many years an Under-Secretary in the Home Department, serving in that capacity under the Duke of Portland ( 1794-1801) and others. He was granted the reversion to the Naval Office in Jamaica 'in reward of his long and faithful services'. Like many other permanent officials in England who were so rewarded, he appointed a deputy when the office fell vacant, and never visited the island.

-278-

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