British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

27
JOSEPH MARRYAT TO HENRY GOULBURN 8 February 18171

SlR,

I have this morning received from New York the enclosed copy of a Bill reported to the House of Representatives by the Chairman of their Committee of Foreign Relations; the object of which evidently is to destroy the trade now carrying on in British ships between the United States and the British West India colonies, and to oblige Great Britain to concede to America during peace the advantage she enjoyed during the War, of supplying those colonies with provisions and lumber in her own vessels. The importance of this measure appears to me to entitle it to the immediate consideration of His Majesty's Ministers, and as it peculiarly affects the interests of the British colonies, I felt it my duty to send it to you to be communicated to Lord Bathurst.

Permit me at the same time to suggest whether this measure might not be effectually counteracted by opening one or two ports in New Brunswick, or Nova Scotia to American vessels, as has already been done with respect to Bermuda? By this means the supplies of lumber and provisions necessary for the West India colonies might be obtained from those ports at only the addition of the coasting freight across the lines and still imported from thence to the West Indies in British ships. On account of the distance between the United States and Bermuda, opening the intercourse through that channel does not afford the same advantage, either in the prime cost of the articles or in the extent of British navigation. . . .


28
RICHARD RUSH TO J. Q. ADAMS 14 June and 17 September 18192

London

14 June 1819

. . . On the 9th I addressed a note to Lord Castlereagh, to request an interview, that I might proceed to lay before this Government, without losing any time, the determinations to which the President had come on the important subject of the commercial intercourse

____________________
1
B.T. 1/113. Henry Goulburn succeeded Peel in August 1812 as Under-Secretary to Lord Bathurst at the Colonial Department, a position which he held until 1821. In July 1814 he had been appointed one of the Commissioners for negotiating peace with the United States.
2

These two letters are printed in American State Papers, Foreign Relations, vol. iv, Wash. 1834, pp. 404-6. Richard Rush was appointed U.S. Envoy to Britain in October 1817.

-289-

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