British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

produce of those provinces should be required, and that timber imported without such certificate should be hereafter charged with the same rate of duty as would be payable on it, if imported directly from a foreign state. . . .


33
ORDER IN COUNCIL, 5 November 18301

At the Court of St. James's.

Present: The King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council.

Whereas, by a certain Act of Parliament, passed in the 6th year of the reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, entitled 'An Act to regulate the trade of the British possessions abroad',2 after reciting that, 'by the Law of Navigation, foreign ships are permitted to import into any of the British possessions abroad, from the countries to which they belong, goods the produce of those countries, and to export goods from such possessions, to be carried to any foreign country whatever, and that it is expedient that such permission should be subject to certain conditions;' it is, therefore, enacted, 'that the privileges thereby granted to foreign ships shall be limited to the ships of those countries which, having colonial possessions, shall grant the like privileges of trading with those possessions to British ships, or which, not having colonial possessions, shall place the commerce and navigation of this country, and of its possessions abroad, upon the footing of the most favoured nation, unless His Majesty, by His Order in Council, shall, in any case, deem it expedient to grant the whole or any of such privileges to the ships of any foreign country, although the conditions aforesaid shall not in all respects be fulfilled by such foreign country:'

And whereas, by a certain Order of His said late Majesty in Council, bearing date the 27th day of July, 1826, after reciting that the conditions mentioned and referred to in the said Act of Parliament had not in all respects been fulfilled by the Government of the United States of America, and that, therefore, the privileges so granted as aforesaid by the Law of Navigation to foreign ships could not lawfully be exercised or enjoyed by the ships of the United States aforesaid, unless His Majesty, by His Order in Council, should grant the whole or any of such privileges to the ships of the United States aforesaid: His said late Majesty did, in pursuance of the powers in Him vested by the said Act, grant the privileges aforesaid to the ships of the said United States; but did thereby provide and declare that such

____________________
1
P.C. 2/211. Printed in Parl. Papers, 1830-1, vol. xvi, pp. 296-7, and in Public Documents of the Senate of the United States, at the second session of the twenty-first Congress, 1830, vol. i, p. 60.
2
See Navigation Acts of 1826:6 Geo. IV, caps. 105 and 109.

-303-

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